Archive for the ‘Fall 2011’ Category

SEEN AND NOTED

Seen and Noted

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Technology got you down? Don’t worry, Cram Quarterly is here with tips and topics to keep you ahead of the technological curve.

SEEN AND NOTED

Seen and Noted

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Do you feel you’re being watched, but no one is there? GCF staff discovers why.

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Daily life, Italian style

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Daily life, Italian style Giovanna Del Bufalo has a keen eye for everyday life in Catania, a bustling city at the foot of Mt. Etna in Sicily. She took her first photos when she was nine years old and has not stopped clicking the shutter since. The fleeting scenes and momentary gestures that she captures on camera are vivid, honest, and full of life. Her work is a reminder that the small moments in life are the most easily overlooked, yet also the most precious. You can find more of her work here.

Photos series below by Giovanna Del Bufalo.
Click on photos to enlarge, click on large photo to close.

bufalo_1 bufalo_2 bufalo_3 bufalo_4 bufalo_6 bufalo_7 bufalo_8

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Photography class

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Photography class A new series of videos shares advice from famous photographer Steve McCurry on how to take great pictures … advice that campus photographers and other communicators can use as they produce still and video images for print and online use. Steve McCurry is an outstanding photographer who created the iconic National Geographic cover shown above.

Contributed by Domenica

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Beyond green-washing

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Beyond green-washing Coca-Cola is putting their advertising money where their mouth is with a new billboard concept in Manila, Philippines. The billboard, which celebrates a partnership between the soda giant and the World Wide Fund for Nature–Philippines, is covered with tea plants, each of which can absorb an average of 13 pounds of carbon dioxide in a year. What we like about the sign (besides cleaner air) is that Coca-Cola isn’t just saying that they’re green—they’re actually putting the message to work and making it stronger than words. Showing your audiences by doing is always more powerful than simply saying it.

Contributed by Theresa

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Showing Baltimore some love

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Showing Baltimore some love Baltimore artist Michael Owen just completed his seventh and largest wall mural to date, one of a series of 20 planned paintings around the city. The “Love” message, spelled out letter by letter in hand gestures, contrasts with gritty urban surroundings and serves as encouragement to care—about each other and about the city.

Contributed by Katie

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Stand up and deliver

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Stand up and deliver Sitting? You might want to stand up for this news. Apparently, sitting all day can significantly shorten your life span and increase your risk for heart disease. What’s a desk worker to do? Enter stand-up desks. This new-fangled furniture allows you to work at your computer while standing. But wait … can’t standing all day result in foot pain, varicose veins, and poor circulation? Perhaps a combination of sitting and standing is key.

Contributed by Jenny

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

QR code idea

Monday, October 31st, 2011

QR code idea In our last newsletter, we talked about the importance of visiting campus in person. But there are some visitors who either don’t take the guided tour or can only be on campus when you are not. In preparation for these self-guided guests, many institutions are adding QR codes to signage. For example, a science building might feature a QR code that links to a video tour of the lab’s latest equipment. According to this article, providing more information helps potential consumers get closer to making a decision. Following that logic, QR codes around campus could help your prospects become more certain about their decision to apply.

Contributed by Katie

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Grand Prix faux pas

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Grand Prix faux pas During the Grand Prix race held in Baltimore, I saw a banner across from the stands with a large QR code printed on it. Unfortunately, it was too far away for anyone to capture the code with a smart phone. Uh-oh! Poor planning caused that ad campaign to crash and burn. It’s so important to think through how we use the new tech tools. With budgets tighter than a racecar driver’s harness, we need to make sure every dollar is spent on materials that are actually designed to reach our audiences.

Contributed by Theresa

FEATURE : A conversation with Mike Lee—Digital Strategy Adviser

A conversation with Mike Lee—Digital Strategy Adviser

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Mike Lee is a Digital Strategy Adviser for AARP and a long-time friend of GCF. He works in the field of mobile development, looking into the future of technology and road-mapping the next year and a half.

What do you think is the most critical tool or skill for educational communicators to have?
It’s important to monitor industry thought leaders on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. At a minimum, use RSS feeds. Get and try to maintain a sense of what is going on out there. Same with mobility/mobile devices—get a smartphone or Android phone, and use it regularly. Try out some apps.

What do you see for the future? What are the latest things to watch for?
Consumer mobile technologies are changing very rapidly. Besides smartphones and tablets, I’d look at what impact may result from the arrival of very low cost e-readers—when you start to see them hanging on a hook in a drug store, or given away as advertising/marketing specialties. Apple, through their marketing and product design, can get away with their higher prices, but Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Google, and Samsung are going to work to pull their prices down. All of that will drive the industry. There’s a profound amount of power when the price is dropping every year. Compared to a backpack full of books…there is no comparison. And it’s not lost on these companies that there’s an opportunity to revolutionize the textbook market. In the future, the publisher will give you a device. Books will be copyright protected and locked to the device. You’ll be able to add things like social media, which is another binding force to lock a student into that publisher’s device.

On the macro level, it’s about the “gang of four” companies who are innovating in the consumer market: Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook. They are setting the trends; they are into devices, the publishing industry, TV/movies, and social media. Google and Apple are moving aggressively into the education market.

What are your thoughts on apps versus mobile sites?
After a year of developing mobile apps for the iPhone and Android, I am really more in favor of mobile web for nonprofit and educational institutions. If you have the opportunity or strategic reasons and money to create an app, that is great—do it. However, your first priority is launching a version of your existing website that just works on mobile devices, because most phones/tablets have a web browser. Your mobile site should fit on a smartphone screen, and it should be readable. Some companies offer mobile templates.

Does the AARP offer their magazine online? Would they ever eliminate the print version?
AARP does have the largest subscriber base to its magazine, but it’s not something you can just buy—you need a membership, and the magazine is a benefit. Right now, our business model for publications is holding because the membership construct around this can still demand advertising dollars, which offset the cost of printing the magazine. The articles are syndicated to the website, and made available in digital facsimile form (PDF). But we will have challenges like many large publishers, such as what will happen with the postal service.

How do you feel about Google+?
It has grown at a faster rate in the beginning than Facebook and Twitter when they started.
They’ve also opened the development end so people can write code to enhance the functionality in ways that Google hasn’t imagined. There will never be one dominant company that owns social media, because these companies all have access to a lot of the same basic tools and approaches (computer chips, servers, etc.).

Any final advice?
The best way to keep up with new developments, both social and mobile, is to immerse yourself. Google calls that dogfooding. There is nothing like firsthand experiences. You can read all you want, but to get a sense of how new technologies work you need to get intimately involved.

See the Cool Tools section for Mike’s recommended news blogs.

FEATURE : Widener Admissions

Widener Admissions

Monday, October 31st, 2011

How do you get the attention of your audience?

The key is to show instead of tell. This is exactly what we’ve done with Widener’s new admissions materials. As the university’s branding messages have evolved, the focus shifted to leadership. But the word “leadership” is not memorable, nor is it unique. “Not for followers,” on the other hand, conveys the concept of becoming a leader without using a cliché, and unexpected images drive the idea home: This place is different.

NOTEWORTHY

Playing with your food

Monday, October 31st, 2011

You’ll never see your food the same after you view these microscopic images by Caren Alpert.

NOTEWORTHY

Outsmart your inbox

Monday, October 31st, 2011

This email charter consists of agreements that would result in fewer, more to-the-point emails—if everyone who emails you followed the guidelines.

COOL TOOLS

Cool Tools

Monday, October 31st, 2011

From Mike Lee During our interview with Mike Lee, he recommended the following: the ReadWriteWeb technology blog for those who want to keep up with the latest web news;  the O’Reilly blog about the technology and media industry;  and The Scholarly Kitchen blog, which helps readers keep up with the hottest trends in traditional publishing.

Typecast Which font will play the starring role in your new website? Google has compiled hundreds of free, open-source fonts that are optimized for the web.

Hollyweb You’ve seen the results of this free movie-making tool on TV commercials and YouTube. Now go make your own!

Stock up on stock photos This article lists at least 15 sources for free stock photos online.

Making art on the iPad If you’re an iPad owner and an artist, look into the new Adobe apps Color Lava, Eazel, and Nav. Color Lava allows you to mix virtual paints to get the colors you want, while Eazel lets you fingerpaint. Nav allows you to work with Photoshop documents on your tablet.

Join Us

Join Us

Monday, October 31st, 2011

…online

CASE Online Speaker Series
December 7, 2011
12–1:30 p.m.

Get Real, Get Read: Producing a Magazine Your Alumni Will Read
Is your alumni magazine making it to the nightstand, or is it landing in the recycle bin? If your publication isn’t being read, this seminar can help you determine why and what to do about it.

Brenda Foster joins two of higher education’s well-known magazine leaders, Ingrid Heim of Temple University and Dale Keiger of Johns Hopkins University, in a lively discussion that will address the biggest obstacles facing alumni magazines today. How do you produce a better magazine in spite of budget cuts and resource limitations? How can you best manage institutional politics and relationships with stakeholders?

…on Facebook

…on Twitter

FEEDBACK

Do you have comments, questions, or story ideas that you’d like us to cover in an upcoming issue of the Cram Quarterly? If so, email Brenda or call her at 410-467-4672.

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