Archive for the ‘Summer 2011’ Category

SEEN AND NOTED

Seen and Noted

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Facing a communications hurdle? The latest issue of Cram Quarterly is here with news, ideas, and tips to give you a leg up. Click here for more photos by Matthew Lester.

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Reinventing the pinhole camera

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Reinventing the pinhole camera One of the lessons I learned in my first photography class was how to make a pinhole camera. As you can see in the image above, my camera was hand-made with cardboard and duct tape. I had no idea back then that the pinhole camera could be taken to the unexpected new territory explored in the photos of Abelardo Morell. Morell transforms entire rooms into camera obscura devices using the same idea behind the pinhole camera. He then photographs the images projected on the walls—astonishing reflections of the views outside the room. The boundaries of creativity are always expanding thanks to innovative ways of seeing by artists like Morell.

Photo series below by Abelardo Morell.
Click on photos to enlarge, click on large photo to close.

morell_1 morell_2 morell_3 morell_4 morell_5

Contributed by Katie

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Are you ready for zombies?

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Are you ready for zombies? The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a blog entry explaining how to prepare for an invasion of the undead. The publicity stunt called attention to emergency preparedness no matter what the circumstance—whether a hurricane, an epidemic, or another kind of disaster. The blog, which normally sees 1,000 hits per entry, suddenly underwent a barrage of nearly one million hits (according to an article in the Seattle Times). The CDC’s server-crashing article shows that even the government is playing by social media rules. Humor gets people’s attention, and pop-culture phenomena like zombies can actually help get an important message across by making it memorable and shareable.

Contributed by Theresa

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Magazines resist the tide of e-readers

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Magazines resist the tide of e-readers Sitting on the beach this summer, I did not see any e-readers, such as the Kindle or the Nook, in the hands of my fellow beachcombers. I did, however, see many dog-eared paperback books and rolled-up magazines. People are still holding on to magazines and other print pieces. Paper publications are lightweight and inexpensive, and they can weather a bit of sand or water. My beach observations were supported by some research GCF recently conducted on a client’s magazine. People enjoy getting a print piece in the mail: it arrives directly in the mailbox, is personally addressed, and has all of the portability and durability the e-readers just do not have.

Contributed by Jenny

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Don’t filter out the truth

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Don’t filter out the truth Online organizer Eli Pariser gave a TED talk in which he cautioned that internet filters, now in use by Facebook, Google, Yahoo! News, and others, are creating individual information bubbles in which each of us is isolated. “The internet is showing us what it thinks we want to see,” he says, “but not necessarily what we need to see.” These filters often keep us from being exposed to challenging or uncomfortable points of view. As marketers, we need to welcome all voices that inform a discussion on Facebook, in our alumni magazines, or in conversations around campus.

Contributed by Theresa and Katie

REAL WORLD MARKETING

Miscellaneous observations from an educational communicator’s perspective

Sustaining interest

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Sustaining interest When GCF landed in Milwaukee for our company retreat, we began with a tour of the historic Miller Brewing Company and a few beer samples. At the end of our tour, our guide mentioned the company’s commitment to the environment and invited everyone to take a copy of their sustainability report available at the back of the room. We were impressed. Your campus tour guides could do something similar at the end of a campus tour to emphasize your school’s sustainability commitment. We’ve noticed in looking at university Facebook pages that fans are interested in what colleges are doing to become more environmentally friendly. Have you thought about offering prospective students and their parents a sustainability report of your own?

Contributed by Theresa

FEATURE : Adapting to Change

Adapting to Change

Monday, August 1st, 2011

A lifetime of history and over 1.5 million pieces of wood type reside at the Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. While visiting, GCF discovered the story of a company that has survived in spite of its original product line becoming obsolete.

When the J.E. Hamilton Holly Wood Type Company was founded in 1880, it manufactured wood type for printing. Its Midwest location suited the business well as the population grew and print shops and newspapers flourished. Purchasing wood type from the east and having it shipped was too costly, so these fledgling businesses turned to Hamilton instead.

As metal type began to replace wood type over the years, Hamilton faced a choice: close down or evolve. The company chose the latter and completely transformed its product line to stay in business. They began making medical cabinets, and then medical tables. The company even branched out to metal cabinets for dryers as modern conveniences flooded into homes. Today, the company is still in existence as Thermo Fisher Scientific, a producer of lab equipment.

When museum director Jim Moran told us the Hamilton story, we were struck by the company’s ability to change their brand to fit the times. The museum has taken a page from Hamilton’s book as well. Retail giant Target is planning to release a new line of clothing with images from the museum’s Globe Printing Plate collection. This collaboration could increase the visibility of the museum and open the door for fundraising opportunities that could help preserve the history of wood type—and the Hamilton company—for future generations.

FEATURE : Designs you know, Designers you don’t

Designs you know, Designers you don’t

Monday, August 1st, 2011

There’s a bit of mystery surrounding who designed the iconic Coca-Cola bottle. A prevalent myth holds that the shape was mistakenly based on the cacao pod. Another credits famous industrial designer Raymond Loewy for the shape, but he didn’t start working for the soda giant until after the bottle was put into use.

The design of the “hobble skirt” bottle actually sprang from a marketing need. Coca-Cola sought a container that would make their product stand out from other sodas, even if the label fell off in the ice bucket. The company challenged its bottle suppliers to a design contest in 1915.

At that time, Earl R. Dean was a supervisor of the bottle molding room at the Root Glass Company, one of Coke’s bottle suppliers. He decided to participate in the contest and wanted to base his design on one of the two key ingredients of Coca-Cola: the kola nut or the coca leaf. Alas, the local library contained no information or pictures of either item. While conducting his search, however, Dean noticed the cacao pod and its striations. Inspiration struck, and the hobble skirt bottle was born.

Although Dean’s design won the contest, his original prototype never reached the production line. The shape was too wide in the middle, which caused the bottles to fall off the conveyor belt. Dean modified the bottle a bit to make it more stable, and now it is an integral part of Coca-Cola’s brand.

Not only is the story of the hobble skirt bottle an interesting one, but it also shows that sometimes, great design results from happenstance. And, even though Dean’s prototype had to be adjusted, it didn’t lose its beauty or practicality. The hobble skirt bottle, Raymond Loewy said later, is “the most perfectly designed package in the world.”

FEATURE : In Person

In Person

Monday, August 1st, 2011

The New Yorker cover above shows parents looking at their cell phones while kids trick-or-treat. Which world is more real: the one in which the parents are engaged, or the children? This is the dilemma we are faced with today. When the real and the virtual worlds collide, which one prevails?

In the case of the campus tour, nothing quite compares to being there in person. Walking around campus allows visitors to really experience what it’s like to live at an institution. A campus tour also fosters the all-important connection to other human beings. It allows visitors to interact with other students, professors, and admissions staff in a way that doesn’t happen on the computer or even on the phone. So if you’re adding QR codes to buildings and signage for the campus tour, and considering offering tour participants sustainability reports, don’t neglect the personal interaction and sensory experiences that make a campus tour important.

FEATURE : Getting the 21st century right

Getting the 21st century right

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Getting the 21st century right The latest issue of ONE, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School alumni magazine, just hit mailboxes. The theme for the Spring/Summer 2011 issue is “Getting the 21st Century Right: Making our way toward a more perfect union, in business, education, and city design.” Barbara Wallace, the magazine’s executive editor, notes that “ultimately, getting it right is about creative, informed, and moral thinking—applying knowledge, empathy, and originality to the radically new economic, social, environmental, and technological challenges this century brings.”

NOTEWORTHY

A different kind of filter

Monday, August 1st, 2011

A different kind of filter Wayne Martin Belger created a camera that uses HIV+ blood as a filter through which he takes portraits of those living with AIDS. His “Untouchable” project raises awareness of the global HIV community and the challenges facing those who are infected in developing countries.

NOTEWORTHY

Really update your resume

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Really update your resume If you’re struggling to stand out in a saturated job market, why not add a QR code to your resume? You’re no longer limited to the one-page summary of experience and accomplishments—now you can share a website or video that showcases your personality as well.

NOTEWORTHY

What are you listening to?

Monday, August 1st, 2011

What are you listening to? Have you ever wondered what people are listening to through their headphones, but felt it would be somehow inappropriate to ask? Ty Cullen asked New Yorkers the question and made a YouTube video of the answers. We were fascinated to be able to listen in and could not stop watching. Perhaps colleges could do something similar to help prospective students get a feel for life on campus. How about asking, “what are you studying/reading/discussing?”

NOTEWORTHY

Feeling small?

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Feeling small? A United Kingdom-based artist who calls himself “Slinkachu” makes tiny people and poses them in cities all over the world, taking photographs close up and then far away. The drastic change in perspective reveals, with a sense of humor, how tiny these models really are, and in some cases how misplaced.

COOL TOOLS

Cool Tools

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Sign language A new app may help students studying in foreign countries. Word Lens translates text from one language to another (for now, English to Spanish and back).

Tech-knowledge-y Here are four tech sites you might want to follow if you don’t already.

mashable.com The hottest site with news about social media, new technology, etc. You should have looked at this site yesterday!

engadget.com Learn about late-breaking tech gadgets.

wired.com If you don’t subscribe to the magazine, which has gorgeous covers, at least check out their news site. Covers all aspects of technology.

techcrunch.com This site compiles all of the gadget, app, tech company acquisitions, and news in one place for your perusal.

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Monday, August 1st, 2011

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Do you have comments, questions, or story ideas that you’d like us to cover in an upcoming issue of the Cram Quarterly? If so, email Brenda or call her at 410-467-4672.

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